Tutorials and Guides

Introduction

Please refer to this pdf file for step by step installation procedure for pinger package. I will convert the pdf file to html pages soon

I have also create a bash script to automate the steps in the tutorial, but this script is definately at an early stage, so please do not use this (or use at your own risk) for actual deployment node. I have successfully tested this on the following linux distribution in a virtual machine environment (virtual box) and also actual server.

  • Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS, 13.04
  • Linux Mint 15 (Cinnamon and Mate)
  • Raspbian Wheezy (Debian 7), running on Raspberry Pi unit
  • Lubuntu 12.04 and 13.04
In general, the script should work on any Debian-based distribution.

View code in separate window

Steps in using the script

I would suggest that you test this script in a virtual machine environment (such as virtualbox or vmware) before using it in actual deployment

  1. Step 1: You (the computer) need to be connected to the Internet.

  2. Step 2: Open a terminal (if you are using a linux distro with Desktop GUI)

  3. Step 3: Download the script from the terminal using wget.
    sudo wget http://pinger.unimas.my/pinger/script/pinger_install.sh
                      

  4. Step 4: Change permission of the script.
    sudo chmod a+x pinger_install.sh
                      

  5. Step 5: Execute the script (and say your prayer....;-) ).
    sudo ./pinger_install.sh
                      

  6. Step 6: Get a cup of coffee (or tea), depending on your Internet connection speed and computer spec, installation can take between 10 to 20 minutes.

  7. Step 7: Modify the pinger.xml file. Basically, there are two things that you need to change:
    1. Navigate to the pinger directory and edit the pinger.xml file using any text editor such as vi, vim, emacs, or nano.
      cd /usr/local/share/pinger
      sudo nano pinger.xml
                        
      change the <SrcName>pinger.unimas.my</SrcName> to the host name of your server.

    2. Add your own list of nodes to be monitored in the <HostList> section.
      Example:
      <Host>
      <IP>110.74.179.2</IP>
      <Name>www.upm.edu.my</Name>
      </Host>
      
                                      

  8. Step 8: Execute the pinger software. Assuming you are in the same directory as Step 8 (/usr/local/share/pinger), execute the pinger2.pl perl script as follows:
    sudo perl pinger2.pl
                      
    If the "Go to sleep value" (refer to figure below) is large (something you are not willing to wait), press Ctrl-c to stop and try again until you get a value which you are willing to wait (for the pinger to start executing).


  9. Step 9: If you see something like the following figure, it means that pinger is running and collecting data, you do not need to perform this step again since there is a cron job that will automate the data collection process every 30 minutes.


  10. Step 10: Finally, the data should be in the data folder (of /usr/local/share/pinger/data) and data collected in text file as shown in figure below.


  11. Step 11: Last bit, if you are running this in an actual deployment, then you need to email Les Cottrell(cottrell@slac.stanford.edu) details about your monitoring node, so that the data collected in your node can be retrieved by the archival site at SLAC.



If you have any comments, correction, feedback about the script, please email me (Johari Abdullah) at johari.abdullah@gmail.com

Introduction

I have created a bash script to automate the steps in installing pinger software for CentOS/Fedora based distribution. I have successfully tested the script on the following linux distribution in a virtual machine environment (virtual box) and also actual server deployment.

  • CentOS version 6.4 and 6.5
  • Fedora version 18/19/20 (both 32 and 64 bit versions)
In general, the script should work on any CentOS/Fedora-based distribution.

View code in separate window

Download bash script

Steps in using the script

I would suggest that you test this script in a virtual machine environment (such as virtualbox or vmware) before using it in actual deployment.

Requirements for successfully running the script:

  1. your user account has the ability to run sudo command (root privilege).
  2. wget command is available in your system.
  3. Apache web server is already installed and the path to the cgi-bin dir is /var/www/cgi-bin/


The steps are:

  1. Step 1: You (the computer) need to be connected to the Internet.

  2. Step 2: Open a terminal (if you are using a linux distro with Desktop GUI)

  3. Step 3: Download the script from the terminal using wget.
    sudo wget http://pinger.unimas.my/pinger/script/pinger_install_centos.sh
                      

  4. Step 4: Change permission of the script.
    sudo chmod a+x pinger_install_centos.sh
                      

  5. Step 5: Execute the script (and say your prayer....;-) ).
    sudo ./pinger_install_centos.sh
                      

  6. Step 5.1: The script add intereactive input to get the value of SrcName.

  7. Step 6: Get a cup of coffee (or tea), depending on your Internet connection speed and computer spec, installation can take between 10 to 20 minutes.

  8. Step 7: Modify the pinger.xml file:

    Navigate to the pinger directory and edit the pinger.xml file using any text editor such as vi, vim, emacs, or nano.

    cd /usr/local/share/pinger
    sudo nano pinger.xml
                      

    Add your own list of nodes to be monitored in the <HostList> section.

    Example:
    <Host>
    <IP>110.74.179.2</IP>
    <Name>www.upm.edu.my</Name>
    </Host>
    
                                    


  9. Step 8: Execute the pinger software. Assuming you are in the same directory as Step 8 (/usr/local/share/pinger), execute the pinger2.pl perl script as follows:
    sudo perl pinger2.pl
                      
    If the "Go to sleep value" (refer to figure below) is large (something you are not willing to wait), press Ctrl-c to stop and try again until you get a value which you are willing to wait (for the pinger to start executing).


  10. Step 9: If you see something like the following figure, it means that pinger is running and collecting data, you do not need to perform this step again since there is a cron job that will automate the data collection process every 30 minutes.


  11. Step 10: Finally, the data should be in the data folder (of /usr/local/share/pinger/data) and data collected in text file as shown in figure below.


  12. Step 11: Last bit, if you are running this in an actual deployment, then you need to email Les Cottrell(cottrell@slac.stanford.edu) details about your monitoring node, so that the data collected in your node can be retrieved by the archival site at SLAC.



If you have any comments, correction, feedback about the script, please email me (Johari Abdullah) at johari.abdullah@gmail.com